Allied Health

“Promoting independence at home”

Heart Foundation Walking Groups

Nutrition and Dietetics

Occupational Therapy

Physiotherapy

Podiatry

Speech Pathology

North East Health Wangaratta offers a High Risk Foot Service 2 days per week. For enquiries please phone (03) 5722 5111

 

Heart Foundation Walking GroupsHF walking group logo

Join up or start your own walking group

The Heart Foundation of Victoria is in a major push to recruit hundreds of walkers to help Aussies live more active, healthier lives.

Most adults know the importance of being active but busy lifestyles, safety concerns and a lack of motivation make it easy for us to put off being active.

‘With more than one in four Australian adults (5.76 million people) doing very little or no exercise at all, the Heart Foundation has found a way to help people get back to being active,’ Select here to visit the Heart Foundation website.

Heart Foundation Walking groups are perfect for people of all ages and fitness levels, but are especially good for people who aren’t currently active and want to change that. 

Heart Foundation Walking groups are a simple, safe way to be active and best of all they are free.

Heart Foundation Walking groups are coordinated locally by Gateway Health, Wangaratta.
Existing groups are:
"Gateway Healthy Hearts" group walks regularly on a Thursday at 10am starting at Gateway Health, 45-47 Mackay Street, Wangaratta.  Select here for more information

“Fun, Fit & Furry” group walks regularly on a Tuesday at 9.30am - 10.30 starting at Open Door Neighbourhood House 61 Burke Street, Wangaratta. T: (03) 5721 9175.

Alternatively, if you would like to start up your own walking group please contact the Allied Health Team on (03) 57232000.

 

Nutrition and Dietetics - A Dietitian can support:

Building confidence in the kitchen to prepare and cook meals.
Food budgeting and cooking skills.
Navigating a supermarket and reading food labels.
Increasing awareness of the food the body needs for good health.
Dietary choices to help conditions such as diabetes and Irritable Bowel Syndrome.
Supporting and assisting the provision of nutrition through tube feeding.
Changes in circumstances that have affected eating, preparation of meals or shopping, e.g. a recent illness or the death of a carer or partner.
Changes in a health condition which requires a higher food intake e.g. recent surgery, wounds, breathing problems.
Unintentional weight loss or gain.
Eating poorly because of a reduced appetite.
Limited food within the home e.g. empty fridge or pantry.
Excessive amounts of uneaten or out of date food in fridge, pantry or bin.

A person may see a Dietitian if they experience:

Changes in circumstances that have affected eating, preparation of meals or shopping, e.g. a recent illness or the death of a carer or partner.
Changes in a health condition which requires a higher food intake e.g. recent surgery, wounds, breathing problems.
Unintentional weight loss or gain.
Eating poorly because of a reduced appetite.
Limited food within the home e.g. empty fridge or pantry.
Excessive amounts of uneaten or out of date food in fridge, pantry or bin.

Select here to view our Nutrition and Dietetics fact sheet.

Select here to view our Skills for living fact sheet.

Select here to view information about fad diets released by the Dietitians Association of Australia

Select here to view information about fad diets and young people released by the Dietitians Association of Australia

 An Occupational Therapist can support:

Making daily tasks easier within the home to promote independence.
Equipment for use within the home such as bathroom or toilet aids.
Home modifications such as changes to the bathroom, rails installation, step modifications or possible ramps.
Promoting confidence to safely go to community venues and join in activities.
Promoting participation in activities of daily life.
Difficulty with showering, dressing and other daily tasks.
Difficulty getting into the home or up stairs.
Pressure sores from seating or bed mattress.
Forgetting information or difficulty planning tasks e.g. planning meals, medications.
Recent falls or trip hazards around the home.
Difficulty with equipment such as wheelchairs or scooters.
Signs of toileting issues within the home.

A person may see a Occupational Therapist if they experience:

Difficulty with showering, dressing and other daily tasks.
Difficulty getting into the home or up stairs.
Pressure sores from seating or bed mattress.
Forgetting information or difficulty planning tasks e.g. planning meals, medications.
Recent falls or trip hazards around the home.
Difficulty with equipment such as wheelchairs or scooters.
Signs of toileting issues within the home.

 

A Physiotherapist can support:

Maintaining strong muscles and bones to be as active and independent as possible.
Assistance with walking and balance.
Strategies to prevent falls.
Home exercise programs to maximise energy and strength.
Walking aids to maintain independence in the community.

A Person may see a Physiotherapist if they experience:

Difficulty moving around the home and community environments, such as using furniture to support or to assist walking.
Difficulty getting in and out of a chair, bed or car.
A change in walking patterns e.g. shuffling or unsteadiness.
Muscle or joint discomfort that limits daily activities.
Long periods of time spent in one position e.g. bed or chair.
Trip hazards around the home e.g. rugs, cords, pets and general clutter.
Recent falls or have a fear of falling.
Noticeable loss of strength and endurance.

Select here to view our Weights and Strength Program (WASP) fact sheet.
Select here to view our Tai Chi for Health fact sheet.
Select here to view our Tai Chi for Diabetes fact sheet.

A Podiatrist can support:

Lower leg and foot wounds.
Foot care advice & education for conditions such as diabetes and vascular disease.
Nail surgery for the management of conditions such as ingrown toenails.
Recommending appropriate shoes and foot orthotics.
Providing foot and nail care (only available to high risk clients in some service areas).
A diagnosis of diabetes, vascular disease and/or rheumatoid arthritis.
Wounds on the lower limb and/or foot .
Loss of feeling and/or sensation of the lower limb or feet.
Aching pain in calf muscles when walking or at night.
Difficulty walking due to pain or soreness in lower leg and feet areas.
Frequent falls.
Overgrown or ingrown toenails.

A person may see a Podiatrist if they experience:

A diagnosis of diabetes, vascular disease and/or rheumatoid arthritis.
Wounds on the lower limb and/or foot.
Loss of feeling and/or sensation of the lower limb or feet.
Aching pain in calf muscles when walking or at night.
Difficulty walking due to pain or soreness in lower leg and feet areas.
Frequent falls.
Overgrown or ingrown toenails.

Speech Pathology
Speech Pathology helps with communication, cognition and swallowing. We see people aged 65 years or older and people with a disability who are less than 65 years of age, and their carer.
Select here to learn more about how Speech Pathology can help you.

 Speech  cognition  swallowing

 

 

 

 

These services have received funding from the Australian and Victorian Governments.